Six notable Canadians offer their thoughts on the TCT

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“As a proud Canadian who has crossed our vast country so many times, I am delighted to be a part of the Trans Canada Trail. Seeing Canada from space is a rare and marvellous perspective, especially when it’s also possible to experience it on foot, close-up and shared with everyone.”
Colonel Chris Hadfield,
Astronaut and Professor

“I’m delighted to support the Trans Canada Trail as it continues to grow. It is a wonderful legacy, and will play a role in getting Canadians, especially youngsters, to become more active. Let’s all get moving on the Trail.”
The Honourable Nancy Greene Raine,
Senator and Olympic Ski Champion

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“The Trans Canada Trail is not just a wilderness trail. It’s an urban trail. I use it to bomb around town on my bike, to commute to work. I like that young people all over Canada can ride, walk, run on the TCT – it’s the best.”
George Stroumboulopoulos,
TV and Radio Host and Producer

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“My father would have been ‘tickled pink’ with this Trail. His every free moment, and there were few, was spent doing outdoor activities with us six kids. I applaud the efforts of all involved in this amazing project ... yet another reason to be a proud Canadian.”
Anne Murray,
Singer and Author

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“Great music has the ability to unite us in such a powerful way. I love that the Trans Canada Trail is another great way to unite Canadians, and connect our great country from coast to coast to coast.”
David Foster,
Canadian Musician, Record Producer, Composer and Chairman, David Foster Foundation

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“I grew up in the natural beauty that is Vancouver Island, BC. My childhood was spent playing in forests, swimming in an unpolluted ocean with nearby freshwater lakes, and hiking through endless terrains of majestic landscapes and nature trails. These memories I shall always cherish.”
Kim Cattrall,
Actress and Executive Producer

Connections: The Ridge Road Heritage Trail

Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush 

Ridge Road Heritage Trail, YT

Ridge Road Heritage Trail, YT

Remnants of the gold rush still dot the landscape around Dawson City, Yukon, where tens of thousands of prospectors from around the world flocked to the Klondike after gold was discovered more than a century ago.

In 1898, the best way to Dawson was through the peaks of the Coast Mountains: the treacherous White Pass, upon which scores of packhorses lost their lives each day, or the steeper, more strenuous Chilkoot Pass. Very quickly, more convenient inroads were built, as the Klondike gold rush put the Yukon on the map – territorial status was granted in 1898, just two years after the initial “strike” at Bonanza Creek.

While the popular sites of beautifully restored Dawson City pay homage to that glorious period of Canadian history, the TCT leads hikers through the surrounding hills to the place where it all began.

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail traverses the heart of gold mining territory, allowing hikers to experience a part of the history of the Klondike, says Toos Omtzigt, a consultant with the Klondike Snowmobile Association, the TCT’s partner in Yukon.

Originally built in 1899 to service the big mines on Sulphur Creek and Dominion Creek, it was the first government-built wagon road in the brand-new territory. It was also used for everyday travel, says Ms. Omtzigt. “In the early days, people used ridges to traverse the country because the valleys were often too swampy to cross in summer-time – this was before there were proper roads,” she explains.

Historical sites of interest and relics along the 33-km-long gravel Trail recall the history of mining in the region, including the Yukon Ditch, built to bring water to the mines; 11 Mile Camp and 15 Mile Camp, roadhouses for miners during the gold rush; and the Soda Station, an old box car used for storing mining supplies.

In 1996, the old road was designated an official Yukon Heritage trail, and reopened for the Klondike Centennial. As part of the Trans Canada Trail network, the Ridge Road Heritage Trail contributes an important element of our national history and culture to all who hike or ride it. In Dawson, the TCT links all Canadians to the romantic heritage of the gold rush and its legendary trails.

Even today, there are areas in the region where visitors can legally pan for gold. “Mining around Dawson never stopped,” says Ms. Omtzigt. “There are still many small placer mines in the region and hikers pass through active mining areas on their way to the trailhead. It’s a bit of living history.” 


Trail connections

Here are just a few special places and ways that the Trail connects with Canada’s history and heritage.

Venerable in Victoria In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community  READ THE ARTICLE  >

Venerable in Victoria

In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community 

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Stampeding the Trail Calgary’s new Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country READ THE ARTICLE  >

Stampeding the Trail

Calgary’s new Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Sentier Charlevoix The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage READ THE ARTICLE  >

Sentier Charlevoix

The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail In rural Saskatchewan, Canada’s Ukrainian farming roots shine READ THE ARTICLE  >

Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail

In rural Saskatchewan, Canada’s Ukrainian farming roots shine

READ THE ARTICLE  >

In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT READ THE ARTICLE  >

In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation

The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT

READ THE ARTICLE  >

 

Connections: In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation

The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT 

Underground Railroad, Chatham to Kent TCT, ON

Underground Railroad, Chatham to Kent TCT, ON

It’s an unassuming site on the TCT – a two-storey cabin nestled among a grove of tall trees – yet its history is known around the world. The home was owned by Reverend Josiah Henson, the famous Canadian abolitionist whose life story inspired the novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe.

The house now bears the name of the fictional character – it’s called ‘Uncle Tom’s Cabin Historic Site.’ But it is Rev. Henson who started his life in slavery, before following the Underground Railroad to freedom and settling in Dresden, Ontario. The final stretch of Henson’s journey, and that of the hundreds of former slaves he then guided to freedom, is part of the Chatham to Kent Trans Canada Trail, a paved, 222-kilometre track passing through picture-perfect rural scenery.

“It’s an honour to walk along that path,” says Melissa Pomeroy, general manager of TCT Ontario. “As a Canadian, I am proud that our national Trail incorporates some of the routes used by the Underground Railroad,” she explains. “These incredibly courageous individuals were seeking liberty for themselves and their children. They arrived here after what must have been an arduous journey and built a better life.”

For Steven Cook, site manager of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, Rev.  Henson’s story is an inspiration. “Walking through the door, visitors are confronted with the fact that this man was born into slavery. He had nothing; he was considered property. When they realize what he accomplished – becoming a father, an author, an abolitionist and one of the co-founders of the first schools in Canada – with so little, they are moved.”

Another part of the museum holds the Underground Railroad Freedom Gallery. “Visitors can see control devices that were used on enslaved people, such as the speculum oris, used to force-feed them, or thumbscrews for getting them to reveal secrets,” Mr. Cook says. “Seeing those devices, what hits home are the horrors of slavery and the courage of those freedom seekers who left the plantations not knowing whether they were going to make it or be returned and again subjected to torture.”

Rev. Henson personified this courage – he sought freedom and helped so many others attain the same through the Underground Railroad, a secret network of routes and safe houses leading escaped slaves to Canada, which operated mainly between 1840 and the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863.

Of the estimated 30,000 former slaves who fled to Canada, most landed in southwestern Ontario, settling in what is now Windsor, Fort Erie, Chatham and other local communities, where “they contributed significantly to the building of our nation,” says Mr. Cook.

Ms. Pomeroy adds that they founded many important communities that are still thriving today. “It’s quite a legacy, and I find it humbling to trace their footprints on the Trail.” 


Trail connections

Here are just a few special places and ways that the Trail connects with Canada’s history and heritage.

Venerable in Victoria In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community  READ THE ARTICLE  >

Venerable in Victoria

In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community 

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Stampeding the Trail Calgary’s new Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country READ THE ARTICLE  >

Stampeding the Trail

Calgary’s new Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Sentier Charlevoix The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage READ THE ARTICLE  >

Sentier Charlevoix

The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail In rural Saskatchewan, Canada’s Ukrainian farming roots shine READ THE ARTICLE  >

Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail

In rural Saskatchewan, Canada’s Ukrainian farming roots shine

READ THE ARTICLE  >

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush READ THE ARTICLE  >

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail

Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush

READ THE ARTICLE  >

 

Connections: Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail

In rural Saskatchewan, Canada's Ukrainian farming roots shine

TCT near Canora, SK

TCT near Canora, SK

Along the Good Spirit Lake to Canora portion of the Trans Canada Trail in Saskatchewan, there are stretches of natural sand dunes, beautiful beaches, marshland and river valleys, but for the most part, the path winds through farming country.

“You have a chance to witness farm life in Saskatchewan as you’re passing farmyards, livestock in pastures or farmers working in the fields,” says TCT co-ordinator Kristen Gabora, whose 4,000-acre farm in Canora lies about a mile from the Trail.

She jokingly calls the area the “pierogi belt,” since more than 13 per cent of Saskatchewan’s population claims Ukrainian heritage, as do more than one million Canadians. Of Ukrainian descent herself, Ms. Gabora’s family has been in the area for more than a century – her grandmother, who is now 101, was born here – and is well integrated into the tight-knit community of 2,400, where people still look out for one another.

In addition to Ukrainian culture, the region boasts a National Doukhobor Heritage Village in Veregin, as well as settlers with a Scandinavian background – a confluence of traditions that has enriched local communities, says Ms. Gabora, who sees evidence of the region’s history in old schoolyards, cemeteries, farms and the landscape itself.

To her, farmers are the ultimate conservationists. “The land means everything to them. If you asked a farmer, he would say that farming is not a job – it’s a way of life,” she says. That deep connection can sometimes prove a challenge for connecting the Trail. “Farmers can be a bit territorial,” Ms. Gabora explains.

At just 33.8 per cent completed, Saskatchewan has the greatest way to go of any jurisdiction in Canada. But this is changing fast, as local communities gain greater awareness of the TCT project. “The Trail has come through Canora,” she says. “And, once we got it, people realized that it’s not meant to change their way of life – it enhances it.”

Sharing a love of the land and an interest in nature, Ms. Gabora sees the Trail as a way of encouraging visitors to learn more and experience a farming community in a largely untouched setting.

It’s that authenticity that makes this stretch so special, says Ms. Gabora, who adds that it hasn’t even been named yet. “The Trakkers Snow Club and the Town of Canora are the stewards of the Trail, and they believe it’s important to find a name that adequately captures the spirit of the place,” she says.

No matter what name it’s given in different parts of the province, she says, “the Trans Canada Trail is going to be great for the rural municipalities of Saskatchewan.” 


Trail connections

Here are just a few special places and ways that the Trail connects with Canada’s history and heritage.

Venerable in Victoria In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community  READ THE ARTICLE  >

Venerable in Victoria

In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community 

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Stampeding the Trail Calgary’s new Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country READ THE ARTICLE  >

Stampeding the Trail

Calgary’s new Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Sentier Charlevoix The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage READ THE ARTICLE  >

Sentier Charlevoix

The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage

READ THE ARTICLE  >

In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT READ THE ARTICLE  >

In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation

The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT

READ THE ARTICLE  >

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush READ THE ARTICLE  >

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail

Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush

READ THE ARTICLE  >

 

Connections: Sentier Charlevoix

The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage 

Sentier Gabrielle Roy Est, in Charlevoix, QC

Sentier Gabrielle Roy Est, in Charlevoix, QC

From the Trans Canada Trail in Charlevoix, a beautiful and historic region about an hour upstream from Quebec City, the coastal cliffs of the St. Lawrence River still appear as they did centuries ago, when French explorers Jacques Cartier and Samuel de Champlain sailed through the massive waterway from the Gulf, deep into what they christened La Nouvelle France.

According to TCT Foundation director Pierre Lassonde, it is only fitting that the Trail follow some of Samuel de Champlain’s historic journeys into Canada. All of this, he said, is thanks to the work being done by TCT volunteers and visionaries as they work to connect the Trail.

“We are proud to say that the TCT is almost completely connected in Quebec,” confirms Richard Senécal, executive director of the Conseil québécois du sentier Transcanadien. “The Sentier extends more than 1,400 kilometres through Quebec, connecting Quebec City and Montreal with the regions of the Outaouais, the Laurentians, the Montérégie, the Eastern Townships and the Bas-Saint-Laurent. Now our focus has shifted to the final sections to complete, up in Charlevoix and Côte-de-Beaupré.”

Indeed, the final 3.7 per cent of la belle province’s TCT is located on the north shore of the St. Lawrence River, extending into the Laurentian Mountains. It is the home of dramatic natural vistas, a historic CP hotel, the renowned Le Massif de Charlevoix ski resort, and Quebec’s original farm-to-fork gastronomic scene, ‘La Route des saveurs,’ which has been attracting food-loving tourists as far back as the 1760s.

Parts of Charlevoix have been designated a World Biosphere Reserve, and this natural environment is dramatically displayed along the Traversée de Charlevoix, a 100-kilometre wilderness Trail linking to the Parc des Grands-Jardins. This part of the Trail features remote, high-elevation boreal forest, populated by protected species that include woodland caribou, grey wolves and peregrine falcons.

By 2017, three more Trail sections will be built, including a new Trail west of the waterfront town of Baie-Saint-Paul, an arts-loving community favoured by the Group of Seven painters. The final section of this Louise-Gasnier Trail will be built this season, while in 2015, other Trail sections will be built leading out of the town, along the river with a walkway over the marshland, and then tracking inland along proposed extensions to the sentiers Gabrielle Roy and Louise-Gasnier.

When complete, the TCT will connect to the well-established Sentier des Caps de Charlevoix, which links to Le Massif downhill skiing resort, and then runs for 43 more kilometres along a highland ridge with glorious views of the Charlevoix coastline.

From these high vantage points, looking out at the characteristic cliffs of the untouched Charlevoix coast, you can easily imagine the ships of Cartier and de Champlain as they first sailed into New France through the brackish, tidal waters of the massive Fleuve Saint-Laurent, to establish Quebec City (Donnacona) and further upstream, Trois-Rivières and Montreal (Hochelaga).

In Charlevoix, as in Canada itself, impossible things sometimes do come true.

“In 2000, linking Mont-Saint-Anne, the Sentier des Caps de Charlevoix, Le Massif, Baie-Saint-Paul and la Traversée de Charlevoix was a distant dream,” said Mr. Senécal. “Today, supported by our Trail groups and local and regional governments, this dream is becoming reality.” 


Trail connections

Here are just a few special places and ways that the Trail connects with Canada’s history and heritage.

Venerable in Victoria In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community  READ THE ARTICLE  >

Venerable in Victoria

In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community 

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Stampeding the Trail Calgary’s new Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country READ THE ARTICLE  >

Stampeding the Trail

Calgary’s new Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail In rural Saskatchewan, Canada’s Ukrainian farming roots shine READ THE ARTICLE  >

Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail

In rural Saskatchewan, Canada’s Ukrainian farming roots shine

READ THE ARTICLE  >

In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT READ THE ARTICLE  >

In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation

The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT

READ THE ARTICLE  >

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush READ THE ARTICLE  >

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail

Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush

READ THE ARTICLE  >

 

Connections: Stampeding the Trail

Calgary’s Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country

Calgary Stampede, via the Cenovus Legacy Trail, AB

Calgary Stampede, via the Cenovus Legacy Trail, AB

Whether you’re a monarch, a Hollywood celebrity, a tourist or a local Albertan, you have not lived until you’ve experienced the energy and excitement of the Calgary Stampede, or as it is billed, “The Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth.”

With more than a million visitors each year, the Stampede is an iconic event as much associated with Canada as it is with the western city where it was conceived and first hosted more than a century ago. The 2013 flood didn’t stop it, despite the fact that Stampede Park itself, not to mention the first ten rows of seats in the Scotiabank Saddledome, was submerged only a week before.

And now, the Stampede is putting its mark on the Trans Canada Trail.

In Calgary, where the TCT’s Elbow River Trail runs along the eastern edge of Stampede Park, a section 650 metres long is going to be widened, refurbished and transformed into the Cenovus Legacy Trail, an open-air museum about Canada’s vibrant western heritage. It will be a journey through time, with public art pieces and interactive displays telling the histories of Calgary, the Stampede and the First Nations people of Alberta.

The Cenovus Legacy Trail is part of a $100-million project that includes a state-of-the-art facility for agricultural community events, a youth education and arts training campus, and a new Riverfront Park – an inner-city space that will house Stampede events as well as civic celebrations and public recreation year-round. All this is being built thanks to a $1.5-million gift from Canadian oil company Cenovus Energy Inc. 

"I love the idea of connecting the Cenovus Legacy Trail and, really, the Calgary Stampede, to a broader, national idea like the Trans Canada Trail," says Sarah Hayes, executive director of the Calgary Stampede Foundation. “The Stampede is not just about Calgary or Alberta, it’s also about Canada’s West. By connecting the Stampede to the Trans Canada Trail, we’re connecting that western heritage with the whole country.”

Ms. Hayes says the refurbished Trail is scheduled to open in September 2015, with full programming expected in 2016. Building the trail – a process that involves reclaiming land under a gravel parking lot and planting 200 trees and 800 shrubs and native grasses – will start this summer. 


Trail connections

Here are just a few special places and ways that the Trail connects with Canada’s history and heritage.

Venerable in Victoria In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community  READ THE ARTICLE  >

Venerable in Victoria

In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community 

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Sentier Charlevoix The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage READ THE ARTICLE  >

Sentier Charlevoix

The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail In rural Saskatchewan, Canada’s Ukrainian farming roots shine READ THE ARTICLE  >

Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail

In rural Saskatchewan, Canada’s Ukrainian farming roots shine

READ THE ARTICLE  >

In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT READ THE ARTICLE  >

In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation

The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT

READ THE ARTICLE  >

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush READ THE ARTICLE  >

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail

Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush

READ THE ARTICLE  >

 

Connections: Venerable in Victoria

In B.C., the TCT links to Canada’s original Chinese community 

Chinatown, via David Foster Way, Victoria, BC

Chinatown, via David Foster Way, Victoria, BC

As it weaves its way across this nation, the Trans Canada Trail touches one thread of Canadian heritage after another – 400-year old Acadian paths in New Brunswick, Loyalist byways in Upper Canada, ancient aboriginal portages in the Canadian Shield, to name only a few. And in Victoria, British Columbia, the TCT links to a fascinating piece of this national fabric.

Victoria is home to Canada’s first, and oldest surviving, Chinese community. It is, in fact, the second-oldest Chinatown in all of North America, after San Francisco.

When this community was founded, back in 1858, British Columbia was not yet a province, nor was Canada even a country. Vancouver Island was its own crown colony, and Victoria (or Fort Victoria, at the time) was little more than a 15-year-old Hudson’s Bay trading post. It was the discovery of gold in the Fraser Valley that put this remote harbour on the international map.

News of the gold strike spread quickly down the coast and, in 1858, scores of would-be miners sailed from San Francisco. Victoria was ideally situated to serve as an outfitting station; many of the new arrivals decided to set up shop there.

Long before the construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway, which would draw thousands of Chinese nationals to B.C., the original Chinese-Canadians put down strong roots in Victoria, founding a community that remains vibrant to this day.

At its peak, Chinatown accounted for half the population of Victoria, with its own hospital, three schools, five temples, two churches, several theatres and more than 150 shops.

It maintained strong social institutions and cultural traditions which, together with its heritage wooden and brick structures, give Victoria much of its character today, particularly in the six remaining blocks of Chinatown.

One of the most characteristic structures has to be the beautiful and massive “Gate of Harmonious Interest,” at the corner of Government and Fisgard streets.

It’s no accident that the TCT leads travellers to this historic Chinatown on its way from Mile Zero West. From Clover Point, the TCT travels up David Foster Way to the 60-km Galloping Goose trail. The Johnson Street Bridge is one short block from famous Fan Tan Alley – the narrowest street in Canada – and the heart of Chinatown.

“When you stop and think about it, you can’t help but be impressed by the tremendous journeys undertaken by all of Canada’s cultural communities,” 


Trail connections

Here are just a few special places and ways that the Trail connects with Canada’s history and heritage.

Stampeding the Trail Calgary’s new Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country READ THE ARTICLE  >

Stampeding the Trail

Calgary’s new Cenovus Legacy Trail connects the city’s western heritage with the whole country

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Sentier Charlevoix The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage READ THE ARTICLE  >

Sentier Charlevoix

The TCT and Canada’s New France heritage

READ THE ARTICLE  >

Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail In rural Saskatchewan, Canada’s Ukrainian farming roots shine READ THE ARTICLE  >

Canora welcomes the Trans Canada Trail

In rural Saskatchewan, Canada’s Ukrainian farming roots shine

READ THE ARTICLE  >

In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT READ THE ARTICLE  >

In Ontario, a historic pathway to emancipation

The Underground Railroad and the Chatham-Kent TCT

READ THE ARTICLE  >

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush READ THE ARTICLE  >

The Ridge Road Heritage Trail

Near Dawson City, the TCT retraces Yukon’s iconic gold rush

READ THE ARTICLE  >

 

The TCT’s “Top 10” milestones 2013-14

The Trans Canada Trail and its partners, champions and supporters are working hard to achieve connection from coast to coast to coast by 2017. Some of the TCT’s highlights this year include the following “top 10” Trail openings, receptions, funding announcements and other special events, all milestones along the way to building a truly national Trail. 

 

APRIL 23, 2013

TCT Reception, Ontario

Valerie Pringle, co-chair of the TCT Foundation, held a lovely reception at her home in Toronto uniting many of the TCT’s core supporters. 

From L to R: Paul LaBarge (chair, TCT); Valerie Pringle (co-chair, TCT Foundation); Sandi Treliving; Mrs. Laureen Harper (TCT honorary campaign chair); Jim Treliving; Donette Chin-Loy; Raymond Chang. 

From L to R: Paul LaBarge (chair, TCT); Valerie Pringle (co-chair, TCT Foundation); Sandi Treliving; Mrs. Laureen Harper (TCT honorary campaign chair); Jim Treliving; Donette Chin-Loy; Raymond Chang. 


SEPTEMBER 27, 2013

Official opening of a 40-km section of the Border to Beaches Trail, Manitoba

More than 100 people – including TCT’s Honorary Campaign Chair, Mrs. Laureen Harper – gathered to officially open the Trail segment connecting Old Pinawa Dam to Whiteshell Provincial Park, Manitoba. Spanning 370 kilometres, the high-quality Border to Beaches Trail links the Ontario border with Grand Beach Provincial Park. 

From L to R: Deborah Apps (president & CEO, TCT); Ruth Kristjanson (vice-president corporate relations, Manitoba Hydro); Laureen Harper (Honorary Campaign Chair); Ian Hughes (president, Trails Manitoba); The Hon. Shelly Glover (Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages). 

From L to R: Deborah Apps (president & CEO, TCT); Ruth Kristjanson (vice-president corporate relations, Manitoba Hydro); Laureen Harper (Honorary Campaign Chair); Ian Hughes (president, Trails Manitoba); The Hon. Shelly Glover (Minister of Canadian Heritage and Official Languages). 


OCTOBER 17, 2013

Sod-turning ceremony for Meewasin Valley Trail, Saskatchewan

Trans Canada Trail and PotashCorp “turned the sod” of an expansion to the Meewasin Valley Trail, named one of the “Top 10 Greatest Hikes In Canada” by Reader’s Digest. Saskatoon’s Meewasin Valley project has been an outstanding success in cultural and natural conservation for more than 30 years and is an important natural resource of the South Saskatchewan River Valley. 

From L to R: Donald Atchison (Mayor, Saskatoon); Lee Knafelc (VP of human resources, PotashCorp); Lloyd Isaak (CEO, Meewasin Valley Authority); Darlene Bessey and Ken Pontikes (campaign cochairs); Deborah Apps (president & CEO, TCT); Jack Vicq (chair, Meewasin Valley Authority). 

From L to R: Donald Atchison (Mayor, Saskatoon); Lee Knafelc (VP of human resources, PotashCorp); Lloyd Isaak (CEO, Meewasin Valley Authority); Darlene Bessey and Ken Pontikes (campaign cochairs); Deborah Apps (president & CEO, TCT); Jack Vicq (chair, Meewasin Valley Authority). 


APRIL 24, 2014

TCT Reception, Ontario

TCT Foundation director, Pierre Lassonde, and his wife Janelle welcomed former astronaut Julie Payette, now a TCT National Champion, Mrs. Laureen Harper and 50 honoured guests to an intimate event at their Toronto home. The highlight of the evening was a charming speech by the Lassondes’ daughter, Laurelle. Having asked her friends and family for donations to the TCT in lieu of gifts for her eighth birthday last year, she is proof that every Canadian can contribute to building our national Trail, no matter their age. 

From L to R: Janelle Lassonde; Laurelle Lassonde; Mrs. Laureen Harper (Honorary Campaign Chair); Pierre Lassonde. 

From L to R: Janelle Lassonde; Laurelle Lassonde; Mrs. Laureen Harper (Honorary Campaign Chair); Pierre Lassonde. 

TCT National Champion Julie Payette shares a moment with young Janelle. PHOTO: LAURA BERMAN 

TCT National Champion Julie Payette shares a moment with young Janelle. PHOTO: LAURA BERMAN 

JUNE 9, 2013

Official opening of the Du Gouffre Trail, Quebec 

The Du Gouffre Trail traverses the world-renowned agricultural and forested lands of the Charlevoix region, and allows for walking, hiking, cycling, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing. Connecting downtown Baie-Saint-Paul to the Trans Canada Trail, this Trail section is an important link between the southern part of Quebec and the Petit Témis Trail, which heads east into New Brunswick. 


OCTOBER 7, 2013

Official opening of Fundy Trail, New Brunswick

Trans Canada Trail, Parks Canada and Sentier NB Trail proudly announced the official opening of the 33-kilometre Fundy Trail. It passes through Fundy National Park, part of the UNESCO Fundy Biosphere Reserve and one of Canada’s most prized landscapes. 

From L to R: Geri Syroteuk (acting superintendent, Fundy National Park); Kirstin Shortt (Mayor, Alma); Wayne Steeves (MLA, Albert); Deborah Apps (president & CEO, TCT); and Poul Jorgensen (executive director, Sentier NB Trails). Photo: Isabelle Spencer, Parks Canada 

From L to R: Geri Syroteuk (acting superintendent, Fundy National Park); Kirstin Shortt (Mayor, Alma); Wayne Steeves (MLA, Albert); Deborah Apps (president & CEO, TCT); and Poul Jorgensen (executive director, Sentier NB Trails). Photo: Isabelle Spencer, Parks Canada 


JANUARY 10, 2014

Federal funding announcement, Kinsol Trestle, B.C.

At this spectacular setting of the TCT on Vancouver Island, Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced funding to help bridge many remaining Trail gaps and connect Canadians from coast to coast to coast by 2017, Canada’s 150th birthday. The matching funds of up to $25-million over four years will be administered by Parks Canada; the agreement will provide one federal dollar for every two dollars raised by the TCT. 

From L to R: Paul LaBarge (chair, TCT); Mrs. Laureen Harper (Honorary Campaign Chair); The Right Honourable Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada; Deborah Apps (president & CEO, TCT); Hartley Richardson and Valerie Pringle (co-chairs, TCT Foundation). 

From L to R: Paul LaBarge (chair, TCT); Mrs. Laureen Harper (Honorary Campaign Chair); The Right Honourable Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada; Deborah Apps (president & CEO, TCT); Hartley Richardson and Valerie Pringle (co-chairs, TCT Foundation). 


JUNE 15, 2013

Official opening of the Lacombe County Trail, Alberta

On this eight-kilometre section of the Trans Canada Trail, hikers and cyclists can enjoy a fully paved path through the rural countryside, connecting the towns of Lacombe and Black- falds. The Trail also features “interpretive signage” created by Grade 5 students who researched the local flora and fauna. 

From L to R: Carol Simpson (Coun- cillor, Town of Blackfalds); Melody Stol (Mayor, Blackfalds); Betty Anne Graves (TCT board member); Dana Kreil (Councillor, Lacombe County); Paula Law (Deputy Reeve, Lacombe County); Linda Strong-Watson (executive director, Alberta TrailNet); Debbie Olsen (president, Central Alberta Regional Trails Society); Ken Wigmore (Reeve, Lacombe County); Rod Fox (MLA); Cliff Soper (Councillor, Lacombe County); Blaine Calkins (MP); Kelly Turkington (acting director of operations, Lacombe Research Centre); Reuben Konnick (Councillor, City of Lacombe). 

From L to R: Carol Simpson (Coun- cillor, Town of Blackfalds); Melody Stol (Mayor, Blackfalds); Betty Anne Graves (TCT board member); Dana Kreil (Councillor, Lacombe County); Paula Law (Deputy Reeve, Lacombe County); Linda Strong-Watson (executive director, Alberta TrailNet); Debbie Olsen (president, Central Alberta Regional Trails Society); Ken Wigmore (Reeve, Lacombe County); Rod Fox (MLA); Cliff Soper (Councillor, Lacombe County); Blaine Calkins (MP); Kelly Turkington (acting director of operations, Lacombe Research Centre); Reuben Konnick (Councillor, City of Lacombe). 


OCTOBER 8, 2013

Announcement of funding to complete the Confederation Trail, Prince Edward Island

On the Trail in Vernon River, TCT president & CEO Deborah Apps announced $1.4-million
in funding to finish connecting the Trail in PEI. This funding will bridge the last remaining gap of the Confederation Trail, between Stratford and Iona, making PEI the second province to fully connect its Trail, after Newfoundland and Labrador. 

From L to R: Charlie McGeoghegan (MLA, Belfast-Murray Harbour), Robert Vessey (Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal), Deborah Apps (president & CEO, TCT), Alan McIsaac (Ministry of Education and Early Childhood Development), Robert Henderson (Ministry of Tourism and Culture), Bryson Guptill (president, Island Trails), David Dunphy (Mayor, Stratford, PEI). 

From L to R: Charlie McGeoghegan (MLA, Belfast-Murray Harbour), Robert Vessey (Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure Renewal), Deborah Apps (president & CEO, TCT), Alan McIsaac (Ministry of Education and Early Childhood Development), Robert Henderson (Ministry of Tourism and Culture), Bryson Guptill (president, Island Trails), David Dunphy (Mayor, Stratford, PEI). 


APRIL 9, 2014

TCT presentation at We Day, Ottawa, Ontario

After finishing his six-year trek on the TCT from Newfoundland to British Columbia in December, intrepid hiker Dana Meise happily waded, boots and all, into the Pacific Ocean. In April, he spoke to 16,000 young people at Canada’s national “We Day” celebrations in Ottawa. 


An achievement for all Canadians to celebrate

TCT Chair and Founding Member Paul LaBarge steps up plans for Canada’s 150th birthday 

 

What’s the best gift to give a country on its 150th birthday? On July 1, 2017, when Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary of Confederation, the national dream that is the Trans Canada Trail will see Canadians from communities across the country celebrating this milestone on the Trail’s scenic paths and waterways.

Their communities may be separated by vast distances, but these celebrants will be connected to each other by the Trail – a vast network of nearly 500 trails that stretch 24,000 kilometres from the Atlantic to the Pacific to the Arctic oceans, running through every province and territory.

“We will have such a celebration on July 1, 2017, with almost 1,000 communities participating in the 150th anniversary celebration,” says Paul LaBarge, chair and founding member of the Trans Canada Trail.

The Trail received a significant financial boost this year when the federal government announced it would provide $1 for every $2 raised by the Trans Canada Trail, to a maximum of $25-million over four years.

How will Canadians coast to coast to coast celebrate the country’s 150th on the Trail? “There are a number of ideas under consideration,” says Mr. LaBarge. “These include a relay that would culminate on Canada Day in Ottawa, and the planting of a series of LED lights that would illuminate the Trail so it could be seen via satellite from outer space.”

Another idea, he suggests, is that “since July 1 is very close to the summer solstice, we could also consider doing a relay all in one day with people from each community along the Trail heading out in both directions to link up with the next adjacent community.”

For all these celebrations, the key is to encourage as many Canadians as possible to be on the Trail as participants, not merely spectators. “The whole concept of the Trans Canada Trail is ownership, participation, action and community,” says Mr. LaBarge. 

The Trail – a community-based project with Trail sections owned and maintained by local groups, municipalities, provincial authorities and national agencies – may be the largest and most precious gift that Canadians will give themselves for the country’s 150th birthday.

It delivers great educational value as a literal path to greater awareness of Canada’s history, and promotes environmental conservation and the protection of green spaces. It’s also an economic asset that can stimulate tourism and create jobs, and a health booster that inspires active living.

More than a gift, the Trail is a national, sustainable legacy that will enrich the lives of future generations of Canadians, says Mr. LaBarge.

“The completed Trail will make us the envy of the world – truly iconic,” he says. “And most important of all, it will be the most fantastic acknowledgement and recognition of our Canadian existence.” 


“The whole concept of the Trans Canada Trail is ownership, participation, action and community.”
Paul LaBarge
is chair and founding member of the Trans Canada Trail
BOARD OF DIRECTORS

The Trans Canada Trail is a non-profit registered charity. Its mission is to promote and assist in the development and use of the Trail in every province and territory. The TCT also provides funding to local Trail organizations to support the development of the Trail. To find out more about the TCT, visit our website, tctrail.ca.

  • Paul LaBarge,Chair, Ontario
  • Tara Atleo, Director, British Columbia
  • Jim Bishop, Director, British Columbia
  • Cameron Clark, Director, Ontario
  • Mylène Forget, Director and Secretary, Quebec
  • Eric Gionet, Director, New Brunswick
  • Betty Anne Graves, Director, Alberta
  • Ron Hicks, Director, British Columbia
  • Ken Killin, Director, Ontario
  • Lori Leach, Director, Saskatchewan
  • Alan MacDonald, Director, Ontario
  • Ruth Marr, Director, Manitoba
  • Rick Morgan, Director, Ontario
  • Claire Morris, Director, Ontario
  • Andrew Parsons, Director and Treasurer, Quebec
  • Cynthia Price, Director, Quebec
  • Neil Yeates, Director, Ontario
  • Valerie Pringle, Co-Chair, TCTF, ex officio

An intersection of national priorities

A conversation with Parks Canada’s director of visitor experience Kara Sherrard 

 

In January of 2014, the Trans Canada Trail was delighted to announce that the federal government, via Parks Canada, will provide matching funding for the TCT, a contribution worth up to $25-million over four years. Why is Parks Canada pleased to support the Trans Canada Trail?

Parks Canada has a long and proud history of trails – they can be discovered in all of our locations. From Canada’s first national park in Banff, to the creation of the Rouge, Canada’s newest and first national urban park, these special places all have trail activities that visitors can enjoy, no matter what level of skill or ability.

The Trans Canada Trail believes as strongly in trails as Parks Canada does, so it is a natural fit to support the efforts of this great organization.

Trail experiences play an important role in facilitating both connections to nature and to Canadians’ most cherished national treasures – National Parks, National Historic Sites and National Marine Conservation Areas.

What better way to take part in Canada’s 150th Celebration of Confederation and the 25th anniversary of the Trans Canada Trail than to experience Parks Canada’s special places on a trail?

Given that 75 per cent of Canadians live in cities, and that 70 per cent of the TCT goes through urban or municipal areas, how do national parks – and our national Trail – help to connect Canadians to nature, and with their country?

Connecting all Canadians to nature, whether in urban or rural areas, is of utmost importance to Parks Canada. We offer a number of opportunities designed to assist Canadians living in urban areas to discover nature, be active in the outdoors, learn camping and nature-related skills, and connect with their natural heritage.

Programs such as the Parks Canada My Parks Pass, the Learn to Camp and Xplorers, as well as our commitment to trails and trail systems, are all valuable ways that national parks can provide Canadians with opportunities to experience nature and become more comfortable within it.

According to the Canadian Parks Council report, “Connecting Canadians with Nature: An Investment in the Well-Being of our Citizens,” urban trails are the number one “gateway to nature” for Canadians. Trails have always been used as an opportunity to connect people to nature in a way that caters to each individual’s ability.

Many urban trail systems incorporate “gateway” trails, which encourage children and families to get outside in places closer to home, somewhere more familiar to them. It is a logical connection that these children and families will gain a larger appreciation of the outdoors and want to explore trails farther from home, perhaps at one of Canada’s National Parks.

Why is a connection with nature important, in your opinion?
We are fortunate to have such unlimited access to unparalleled natural beauty in our country.

I believe there is a balance that comes with taking time to connect with our surroundings in day-to-day life, but sadly, many of us have forgotten this or cannot find the time to enjoy our natural surroundings.

The good news is that it is easy to reverse this – seek out a trail and go for a walk, run, bike or horseback ride. Connect with nature close to home, or visit a national park and take advantage of the special places that have been set aside for all Canadians to enjoy. 


The Coastal Trail in Fundy National Park, NB

The Coastal Trail in Fundy National Park, NB

Banff Legacy Trail in Banff National Park, AB

Banff Legacy Trail in Banff National Park, AB

Parks Canada and the Trans Canada Trail intersect in two beautiful locations: the Coastal Trail in Fundy National Park and the Banff Legacy Trail in Banff National Park. 

PARKS CANADA/PROVINCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK; BANFF LAKE LOUISE TOURISM/P. ZIZKA 

Nation builders: CIBC

Canada’s history was forged by pioneers and trailblazers. Nation builders. People of the same vision and character as many of today‘s leaders, families, businesses and foundations, who are connecting the Trans Canada Trail for all Canadians. This year, the Trans Canada Trail welcomed five new leaders as donors to its Chapter 150 Campaign. By committing a minimum of $500,000 in support of the TCT, these modern-day nation builders have helped the Trail reach a connection level of 75 per cent nationwide. But there is still much more to do in order to achieve connection by 2017. 

Gerald T. McCaughey

President and Chief Executive Officer, CIBC

"CIBC is a proud supporter of the Trans Canada Trail and its inspiring vision to span the breadth of our diverse country – in time for Canada’s 150th anniversary in 2017.

The Trail connects us to Canada’s extraordinary natural beauty and to each other, linking millions of Canadians from coast to coast to coast. Whether you like to hike, bike or simply enjoy our pristine national parks and waterways, the Trail offers an open invitation to all of us to get outside and discover Canada.

CIBC has been a part of the Canadian landscape since Confederation. We have been a partner in the economic vitality and sustainable growth of the thousands of communities we serve, supported by a strong tradition of employee volunteerism.

On behalf of all of us at CIBC, thank you to the thousands of volunteers and supporters who are making the Trans Canada dream a reality. As we prepare to celebrate Canada’s 150th birthday in 2017 – and CIBC’s own 150-year anniversary – the Trail will be an important symbol of unity and a legacy for future generations."

CHAPTER 150 LEADERSHIP DONORS

The following organizations and individuals have each committed a minimum of $500,000 in support of the TCT.

  • Richardson Foundation
  • Nancy Baron, Trustee, The W. Garfield Weston Foundation
  • Teck Resources Limited
  • David Aisenstat, President & CEO, The Keg Steakhouse + Bar
  • The Ross Beaty Family
  • Brookfield Partners Foundation, Tim Price and Jack Cockwell
  • CIBC
  • CN
  • Esri Canada Limited (in-kind)
  • The Globe and Mail (in-kind)
  • Pierre Lassonde
  • Loblaw Companies Limited
  • Jon & Nancy Love
  • Rob & Cheryl McEwen
  • PotashCorp
  • Power Corporation of Canada
  • Robert A. Quartermain, President and CEO, Director, Pretivm
  • Shaw Media (in-kind)
  • Sudbury Integrated Nickel Operations, A Glencore Company
  • TransCanada Corp

CHAPTER 150

Nation builders

Robert A. Quartermain President and Chief Executive Officer, Director, Pretivm 

Robert A. Quartermain
President and Chief Executive Officer, Director, Pretivm 

Galen G. Weston  Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited 

Galen G. Weston 
Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited 

William J. Doyle President and Chief Executive Officer, PotashCorp

William J. Doyle
President and Chief Executive Officer, PotashCorp

Nation builders: PotashCorp

Canada’s history was forged by pioneers and trailblazers. Nation builders. People of the same vision and character as many of today‘s leaders, families, businesses and foundations, who are connecting the Trans Canada Trail for all Canadians. This year, the Trans Canada Trail welcomed five new leaders as donors to its Chapter 150 Campaign. By committing a minimum of $500,000 in support of the TCT, these modern-day nation builders have helped the Trail reach a connection level of 75 per cent nationwide. But there is still much more to do in order to achieve connection by 2017. 

William J. Doyle

President and Chief Executive Officer, PotashCorp

"At PotashCorp, we have a strong connection to the land – through the essential nutrients we produce for farmers, who use our products to help grow healthy, nutritious food. Our potash, nitrogen and phosphate products are transported to more than 40 countries around the world, but at the heart of our company is the land, and what it can grow.

The Trans Canada Trail is an important part of enjoying our natural environment and building our sense of community. For these reasons, PotashCorp is pleased to play a role in extending the Meewasin Valley Trail to connect the City of Saskatoon to an outstanding national historic site – Wanuskewin Heritage Park.

Saskatchewan is such a beautiful province, and we are proud to invest in completing this portion of the Trans Canada Trail. We look forward to celebrating a Trail that connects Canadians from coast to coast to coast by 2017."

CHAPTER 150 LEADERSHIP DONORS

The following organizations and individuals have each committed a minimum of $500,000 in support of the TCT.

  • Richardson Foundation
  • Nancy Baron, Trustee, The W. Garfield Weston Foundation
  • Teck Resources Limited
  • David Aisenstat, President & CEO, The Keg Steakhouse + Bar
  • The Ross Beaty Family
  • Brookfield Partners Foundation, Tim Price and Jack Cockwell
  • CIBC
  • CN
  • Esri Canada Limited (in-kind)
  • The Globe and Mail (in-kind)
  • Pierre Lassonde
  • Loblaw Companies Limited
  • Jon & Nancy Love
  • Rob & Cheryl McEwen
  • PotashCorp
  • Power Corporation of Canada
  • Robert A. Quartermain, President and CEO, Director, Pretivm
  • Shaw Media (in-kind)
  • Sudbury Integrated Nickel Operations, A Glencore Company
  • TransCanada Corp

CHAPTER 150

Nation builders

Robert A. Quartermain President and Chief Executive Officer, Director, Pretivm 

Robert A. Quartermain
President and Chief Executive Officer, Director, Pretivm 

Galen G. Weston  Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited 

Galen G. Weston 
Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited 

Gerald T. McCaughey President and Chief Executive Officer, CIBC 

Gerald T. McCaughey
President and Chief Executive Officer, CIBC 

Nation builders: Loblaw Companies Limited.

Canada’s history was forged by pioneers and trailblazers. Nation builders. People of the same vision and character as many of today‘s leaders, families, businesses and foundations, who are connecting the Trans Canada Trail for all Canadians. This year, the Trans Canada Trail welcomed five new leaders as donors to its Chapter 150 Campaign. By committing a minimum of $500,000 in support of the TCT, these modern-day nation builders have helped the Trail reach a connection level of 75 per cent nationwide. But there is still much more to do in order to achieve connection by 2017. 

Galen G. Weston

Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited

"The grand stretch of our nation deserves the grand stretch of the Trans Canada Trail.

In part, the Trail reflects the sheer geographic span and settings that have defined Canada since its earliest days. More importantly, it creates a tie between the communities and happenings, big and small, that define today’s Canada.

Loblaw’s stated purpose is to help Canadians ‘Live Life Well.’ Our company values – like the values of so many Canadians – include respect for the environment and dedication to communities.

Supporting the Trail is a wonderful way to bring these commitments to life. It offers a truly Canadian opportunity to get out, get active and get in touch with the places that make our nation such a sight to see."

CHAPTER 150 LEADERSHIP DONORS

The following organizations and individuals have each committed a minimum of $500,000 in support of the TCT.

  • Richardson Foundation
  • Nancy Baron, Trustee, The W. Garfield Weston Foundation
  • Teck Resources Limited
  • David Aisenstat, President & CEO, The Keg Steakhouse + Bar
  • The Ross Beaty Family
  • Brookfield Partners Foundation, Tim Price and Jack Cockwell
  • CIBC
  • CN
  • Esri Canada Limited (in-kind)
  • The Globe and Mail (in-kind)
  • Pierre Lassonde
  • Loblaw Companies Limited
  • Jon & Nancy Love
  • Rob & Cheryl McEwen
  • PotashCorp
  • Power Corporation of Canada
  • Robert A. Quartermain, President and CEO, Director, Pretivm
  • Shaw Media (in-kind)
  • Sudbury Integrated Nickel Operations, A Glencore Company
  • TransCanada Corp

CHAPTER 150

Nation builders

Robert A. Quartermain President and Chief Executive Officer, Director, Pretivm 

Robert A. Quartermain
President and Chief Executive Officer, Director, Pretivm 

William J. Doyle President and Chief Executive Officer, PotashCorp

William J. Doyle
President and Chief Executive Officer, PotashCorp

Gerald T. McCaughey President and Chief Executive Officer, CIBC 

Gerald T. McCaughey
President and Chief Executive Officer, CIBC 

Nation builders: Robert A. Quartermain

Canada’s history was forged by pioneers and trailblazers. Nation builders. People of the same vision and character as many of today‘s leaders, families, businesses and foundations, who are connecting the Trans Canada Trail for all Canadians. This year, the Trans Canada Trail welcomed five new leaders as donors to its Chapter 150 Campaign. By committing a minimum of $500,000 in support of the TCT, these modern-day nation builders have helped the Trail reach a connection level of 75 per cent nationwide. But there is still much more to do in order to achieve connection by 2017. 

Robert A. Quartermain

President and Chief Executive Officer, Director, Pretivm 

"Almost every day, I run or walk on the Trans Canada Trail – to my office in downtown Vancouver, or to Granville Island to get groceries. I also have a home in Fredericton, New Brunswick – near where I grew up – that is located on the Salamanca Trail, connecting to the TCT and the Bill Thorpe Walking Bridge (Old Railway Bridge) that crosses the St. John River, where one can get outdoors year-round.

As an exploration geologist, I have spent the past 38 years living and working in nearly every province and territory of this great country – often in remote areas like Baker Lake (Nunavut), Natashquan on the lower St. Lawrence River (Quebec), and Daniel’s Harbour, near Gros Morne National Park (Newfoundland and Labrador).

This country has been very good to me; supporting the TCT is a way for me to give back and help celebrate our country’s 150th birthday. It’s also a great way to promote green activities and healthy living. That’s good for all of us."

CHAPTER 150 LEADERSHIP DONORS

The following organizations and individuals have each committed a minimum of $500,000 in support of the TCT.

  • Richardson Foundation
  • Nancy Baron, Trustee, The W. Garfield Weston Foundation
  • Teck Resources Limited
  • David Aisenstat, President & CEO, The Keg Steakhouse + Bar
  • The Ross Beaty Family
  • Brookfield Partners Foundation, Tim Price and Jack Cockwell
  • CIBC
  • CN
  • Esri Canada Limited (in-kind)
  • The Globe and Mail (in-kind)
  • Pierre Lassonde
  • Loblaw Companies Limited
  • Jon & Nancy Love
  • Rob & Cheryl McEwen
  • PotashCorp
  • Power Corporation of Canada
  • Robert A. Quartermain, President and CEO, Director, Pretivm
  • Shaw Media (in-kind)
  • Sudbury Integrated Nickel Operations, A Glencore Company
  • TransCanada Corp

CHAPTER 150

Nation builders

Galen G. Weston  Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited 

Galen G. Weston 
Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited 

William J. Doyle President and Chief Executive Officer, PotashCorp

William J. Doyle
President and Chief Executive Officer, PotashCorp

Gerald T. McCaughey President and Chief Executive Officer, CIBC 

Gerald T. McCaughey
President and Chief Executive Officer, CIBC 

Nation builders: Jon and Nancy Love

Canada’s history was forged by pioneers and trailblazers. Nation builders. People of the same vision and character as many of today‘s leaders, families, businesses and foundations, who are connecting the Trans Canada Trail for all Canadians. This year, the Trans Canada Trail welcomed five new leaders as donors to its Chapter 150 Campaign. By committing a minimum of $500,000 in support of the TCT, these modern-day nation builders have helped the Trail reach a connection level of 75 per cent nationwide. But there is still much more to do in order to achieve connection by 2017. 

Jon and Nancy Love 

"Our family is proud to be Canadian; we have roots in PEI and have lived in Alberta and Ontario. Over the years, with our children, we have driven every mile of the Trans-Canada Highway and experienced Canada’s natural diversity. We’ve visited such beautiful places as Loon Lake, north of Saskatoon, seen the polar bears in Churchill, Manitoba, and spent summers hiking in Ontario’s parks and Alberta’s mountains, and camping on beaches from Tofino on Vancouver Island’s west coast to Newfoundland’s Avalon Peninsula and PEI’s red-sand shores.

The Trans Canada Trail affords Canadians ways to experience our country’s enormous scale and diversity, including its geography, climates and people, just like the Trans-Canada Highway did for our family, and what the CPR did in its generation.

By connecting these and other special places together, the Trail is a great symbol of Canada’s unity, and the extraordinary Canadian journey that makes us all proud."

CHAPTER 150 LEADERSHIP DONORS

The following organizations and individuals have each committed a minimum of $500,000 in support of the TCT.

  • Richardson Foundation
  • Nancy Baron, Trustee, The W. Garfield Weston Foundation
  • Teck Resources Limited
  • David Aisenstat, President & CEO, The Keg Steakhouse + Bar
  • The Ross Beaty Family
  • Brookfield Partners Foundation, Tim Price and Jack Cockwell
  • CIBC
  • CN
  • Esri Canada Limited (in-kind)
  • The Globe and Mail (in-kind)
  • Pierre Lassonde
  • Loblaw Companies Limited
  • Jon & Nancy Love
  • Rob & Cheryl McEwen
  • PotashCorp
  • Power Corporation of Canada
  • Robert A. Quartermain, President and CEO, Director, Pretivm
  • Shaw Media (in-kind)
  • Sudbury Integrated Nickel Operations, A Glencore Company
  • TransCanada Corp

CHAPTER 150

Nation builders

Robert A. Quartermain President and Chief Executive Officer, Director, Pretivm 

Robert A. Quartermain
President and Chief Executive Officer, Director, Pretivm 

Galen G. Weston  Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited 

Galen G. Weston 
Executive Chairman, Loblaw Companies Limited 

William J. Doyle President and Chief Executive Officer, PotashCorp

William J. Doyle
President and Chief Executive Officer, PotashCorp

Gerald T. McCaughey President and Chief Executive Officer, CIBC 

Gerald T. McCaughey
President and Chief Executive Officer, CIBC